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    Mixing cabs

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    coolhandjjl

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    Join date : 2014-07-25

    Mixing cabs

    Post by coolhandjjl on Sun Jul 27, 2014 11:36 pm

    In the olden days, mixing different cabs that covered similar frequency ranges was bad practice. Here, I see pics of a MAS46 on top of a MAS110Flex. If someone wanted to own two different styles of cabs such as a MAS46 for certain types of gigs, a MA112 (or MA112Essential) for other types of gigs, could they be used together for blistering sound with the MA112 horizontal, and the MAS46 on top?
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    Steve Regier
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    Re: Mixing cabs

    Post by Steve Regier on Mon Jul 28, 2014 8:27 am

    Yes, we mix cabs in the shop all the time. Mike does as well. MVWs have their do's and don't s but mixing 'em like this is fine.


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    coyoteboy
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    Re: Mixing cabs

    Post by coyoteboy on Thu Dec 25, 2014 3:12 pm

    Does this have to do with the decorrolation effect? That the individual enclosures are decorrolated from themselves, therefore decorrolated/ non-interferring with each other?

    Did I spell decorrolate correctly?
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    Steve Regier
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    Re: Mixing cabs

    Post by Steve Regier on Thu Dec 25, 2014 3:42 pm

    Since the sound is recombined in pseudo random phase and frequency, the negative interactions are reduced to a less audible level. This is true for room interactions as well as mixing MVW loudspeakers. Furthermore, the in pulse of the MVW is as important as the out pulse. Energy and matter can be transmitted through a vortex (a phenomenon that can be demonstrated by adding dye at one end of a vortex ring and watching it emerge at the other) and a wave cannot effectively transfer matter. Consequently the in /out pulse of one MVW will cause a sympathetic energy transfer in another MVW Loudspeaker. This is not just acoustic coupling but dynamic transfer of energy. We have verified this multiple times by various means. You can as well, if you have more than one MVW Loudspeaker. Place them side by side with only one powered. Measure the combined output. Also take note that the unpowered loudspeaker will be radiating as well. My measurements show that in general the unpowered MVW Loudspeaker will add about 3db. This extra output is not free,  however.  It will  narrow dispersion. We have done this in PA scenarios by placing unpowered MVW subwoofers at both ends of the stage flanking the powered array. The passive units raised the output in the audience area while reducing the bass outside that area. This is also why MVW Loudspeakers should not be aimed directly towards each other.

    Notes/Rules for mixing MVW Loudspeakers:

    Arrange the loudspeakers so that the radiating surface (front) are as close to touching as  possible.

    They may be arranged in either vertical or horizontal alignment. However, the closer the transducers are in proximity to a boundary such as a floor the more the transducers become coupled to the boundary thus increasing bass sensitivity. The MVW output flares are less sensitive to this coupling.

    The radiating surfaces may be crossed-fired or toed in to increase dispersion. Toe out our having the loudspeakers splayed away from each other will cause very nasty comb filtering.

    The loudspeakers should never be placed facing each other even from across a stage (side fill). This will also cause comb filtering.

    MVW Loudspeakers should be placed in the same vertical plane when used as L&R sources with space between them. For instance left and right mains on a stage. Pointing the loudspeakers towards our away from each other in an attempt to increase dispersion will narrow the coverage and cause comb filtering. The 140 degree coverage of the MVW mains will be best utilized with the mains parallel to each other and facing directly towards the audience.


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    coyoteboy
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    Re: Mixing cabs

    Post by coyoteboy on Thu Dec 25, 2014 4:57 pm

    Thanks much for the explain.

    Gonna try an experiment tomorrow @ work which is a large open shop space with only a few of us working. MA-109 horizontal at one end of the shop with music playback, making anecdotal observations at various points in the space.

    Im thinking Primus.
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    Steve Regier
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    Re: Mixing cabs

    Post by Steve Regier on Thu Dec 25, 2014 5:34 pm

    Looking forward to hearing about your observations.


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    coyoteboy
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    Post by coyoteboy on Fri Dec 26, 2014 2:33 pm

    Well, didnt get very far before my 1/8 to 1/4 adapter quit on me. Sounded good till then running both the 26 and 109. Try again after work.

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